5 things you should do at the Cramlington conference

In the last Friday in June, Cramlington Learning Village hosts its annual conference, the Festival of Learning.  Each year around 300 heads, deputies and other decision-makers from schools all around the country (and a few other countries) trek up to Northumberland for a day of sharing, tips, workshops and networking.

40+ workshops on leadership, teaching and learning (including one on the VLE involving yours truly) and this year, it’s not just Cramlington’s own, but other teachers from other schools within the Teaching School Alliance.

OK, enough of the advert.  The day is intensive, busy and if you’re not careful, you’ll miss the best bits…so without further preamble, here’s 5 things I think you have to do:

1 – Go to the TeachMeet the night before

It’s become a tradition to host a Teachmeet the night before the conference.  This is a chance for everyone to jump in with their own tips and tricks.  Presentations are 2 or 7 minutes, drinks are donated by RealSmart (including their own brand beer, I believe).  If you’ve travelled up the night before, and don’t want to sit in a Travel Lodge all night, it’s a great opportunity to chat with like-minded people and get an idea of what CLV is really like.

I have to confess, I don’t go to the Teachmeet, but only because I’m shattered from running round all week getting things ready for the big day itself.  But the teachers running the Teachmeet are all completely fresh, having only had to teach off timetable projects for two weeks straight.    Please, please….that previous sentence was to be read with a touch of irony.

2 – Ask questions at any time

OK, maybe not during the keynotes, but any other time, really.   We’re running workshops not presentations.  Yes, it may interrupt the flow, but chances are you’re asking something others in the room are thinking.

There are no stupid questions

Personally, I prefer to be interrupted for questions rather than waiting for the end.  Breaking from delivery generally improves my pacing and gives me a chance to gauge the room properly:

  • “Are people looking interested?”
  • “Do they have lots of notes in front of them?”
  • “Is that one guy asleep or unconscious?”

Also, there’s its kinda awful to end on a PowerPoint slide which says “Any questions?” and…nothing.  And you’ve deliberately built in 10-15 minutes of a 75 minute presentation.  This year, I might get a tumbleweed prop ready.  Just in case.

If you see us in the refreshment bit, don’t be afraid to ask us then either.  The shutters don’t come down the second the workshop ends.  You’ve paid a chunk of money and travelled a fair way to visit Cramlington, I don’t think its unreasonable that you get all your questions answered.

3 – Split up

I talked about this in my previous post regarding the Frog conference, but I think it’s worth mentioning again.  There are 40+ workshops running over three sessions.  Split up and go to more than 3.  I find it surprising just how often schools will pay to send 4+ delegates <commercial>Group discounts are available</commercial> and two will come into my workshop.  Hey I’m a good speaker, but I’d understand if you didn’t all come to in.

4 – Speak to the Exhibitors

We have a policy of only allowing exhibitors who have products we use in school.  So if you see a stand at the Festival of Learning conference, you know it comes with our recommendation.  Speak to the people on the stands, then come find one of the workshop presenters.  They’ll back up what you’ve been told, because we use them.  Every day.

5 – Save room for dessert

This sounds silly and hardly ‘CPD-y’, but sometimes, you’ve got to just say “who cares”. The catering company we use always goes full-out for the food.  On arrival, the coffee / tea with sausage, bacon (or veggie alternative) sandwich starts the day off, followed by refreshments after the keynote and a really excellent lunch buffet.  I love our school kitchens, but this catering for this event is some of the best food I’ve ever tasted on a mass catering level and certainly puts school dinners to shame.

But all of that is nothing compared to the sweet treats.  Last year we had an ice cream tent, the year before popcorn and pick-and-mix.   Trust me, save room for dessert.

Bonus extra point

If you read my blog, come say “Hi” and say “I read your blog”.  I’m hardly in the top 100 bloggers or anything, but some people are reading this.  I know from the stats.  They can’t all by my mum.  In fact, the number of visitors I get is often what pushes me back to the keyboard.  There’s nothing more annoying than a dead blog.

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